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Thread: Thinking of moving: CO or CA. Opinions?

  1. #41
    mAdminstrator Random's Avatar
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    Yeah, there are some nice spots within the overall LA area. 1) They cost a lot (BH, Pasadena, etc); 2) they aren't the majority, IMO.
    Whoomah!

  2. #42
    High Plains Luddite George's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Random View Post
    15 to 20 minutes away from my house, by bicycle:


  3. #43
    Spiny beast TheBenior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 21Kid View Post
    . And if it snows, it's pretty for a day... then it mixes with the road dirt and turns grey too.
    Ah, I remember when Nigel scoffed at me getting snow tires for Chicago, I told him, "Well, a heavy snowstorm doesn't melt away 2 days later from intense sunlight like in Denver. It lays around looking like ass for 2 months."

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by 21Kid View Post
    Just found out... Frazier Park
    WHAT. That is a horrible place. HORRIBLE. When Lancaster is a step up, the only place you can be is the bottom. I highly recommend visiting there, and then never going back.

    BUT, you're not talking about living there, only that you know people who do, yeah?

    Edit: No, you can't be talking about living there. There is nowhere to work there, much less any hospitals. I suspect the nearest place you'd find an actual hospital is 80 miles away.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil_SS View Post
    I'd go NorCal or Coolerado. Since you aren't considering NorCal it has to be Coolerado.
    There is some seriously excellent medical opportunities in NorCal, and you get a lot of options in terms of big cities, mountains, beaches, and even desert. It's a solid place to live for sure - where I am, coastal Oregon, and central Colorado are the places I'd choose to live in these United States, and I'm already in one of them.

  6. #46
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    What's so special about coastal Oregon? (Never been there... just wondering...)

  7. #47
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    You know, I don't know. I am more of a "mountains person" than a "beach person," and somehow coastal Oregon combines the two very well. It's not unlike central coastal California - maybe from Santa Barbara to Monterey - but the towns are smaller and quainter, the people a little more laid back. Wrap in lower government overhead (taxes, etc.) and generally lower cost of living and it's a nice place to be. If you have time, go poke around Google Maps in Newport or Brookings. I'd even go east, like Grant's Pass or Eugene.

  8. #48
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    Hmm..., okay, we'll consider it as one of our future vacation destinations. Wife and I do love all those smaller coastal CA towns you mentioned... so we'll probably enjoy Oregon!

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cam View Post
    Those things are only important if you measure your happiness by your bank account.
    So wrong.

  10. #50
    Consultant KillerB's Avatar
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    Irvine is nice enough. Plenty of green, though water restrictions may eventually cause that to stop. But it's not really for me... it's kind of Stepford Wives, and the Irvine Company does some hinky things with land ownership (I wouldn't count on actually owning the land under your house in Irvine). But that's Irvine. There are plenty of nice surrounding communities. They're all pretty pricey, though.

    The thing about LA is that you don't need to be close to "the city." There is basically unbroken urban and suburban settlement from Santa Monica in the northwest to San Clemente in the southeast, and it goes right up to the foothills in the north. Basically, everything south and east of where the 405, 5, and 210 come together near Northridge, to an imaginary line drawn from San Clemente to San Bernardino is effectively one huge metropolis. There are open spaces to be had, for sure - and anything from low desert to over a mile elevation is within a two hour drive from nearly anywhere in the area - but just because you're technically "35 miles from Los Angeles" doesn't mean you're in the sticks. (I live in Costa Mesa, CA - about 42 miles from DTLA, and I am *never* wanting for things to do. Everything from Long Beach to Laguna Beach is only 30 minutes away.)

    Los Angeles County and Orange County combined have over 12 million people - more than twice the total population of all of Colorado.

    Cost of Living:

    You can save money living inland, but then your commute will suck.

    Cost of living isn't just the cost of housing. Heating and cooling costs can potentially be a fraction of what they are elsewhere, especially if you live near the ocean. Commute costs are a factor.

    It's all about understanding what is important to you and whether your resources will get you that. How many kids do you have? How much square footage do you need? How much do you think you'll need when your wife is through residency? You have to look honestly at what you can make in the area, and what your wife will make a resident, then as a physician. Will she be a surgeon? You probably can live wherever the hell you want. Will she be a GP? You may be more sensitive to the cost of living.

    What was important to me may not be what's important to you. I was willing to sacrifice square footage and the ability to own "stuff," in order to live somewhere with some of the mildest weather in the world, literally any form of entertainment I could ever want, a generally optimistic atmosphere, and a diverse, basically bulletproof local economy. I also don't like being stuck with the scene in just one city. Snow is something I only care to see on the mountains in the distance, and I love the ocean. I don't think I could never be happy in Denver.

    Then again, I've never been there. That's probably the biggest point - you really need to visit both.

    If you need a 3,500 square foot house to be happy, you're probably better off in CO - unless you or your wife make big bucks (or will be when her residency is done).
    Last edited by KillerB; February 19th, 2016 at 03:50 PM.

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