Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 32

Thread: Terminology issue: Manual vs. "Automatic" these days

  1. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    10,171
    Cue YW....

  2. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    3,569
    Nah it's ok, I'm good.

  3. #23
    Recreational Gynecologist MR2 Fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Tampa Bay, Florida
    Posts
    2,426
    Cop: Why were you speeding?
    Driver: Testing my Semi-Automatic
    Cop: *draws gun* GET OUT OF THE CAR NOW!!
    ║]=(86)=[║

  4. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Croydon, UK
    Posts
    355
    Is this the right room for an argument ?

    For me, what I care about is that the ratio between engine speed and wheel speed is under the explicit control of the driver.
    So a manual counts, because it's fixed until the driver puts the clutch in and chooses a different ratio.
    A DSG counts, assuming it has a 'manual' mode where it stays in the gear the driver picks. Ok, on initial getaway it slips the clutch for you, but once moving it can be directly controlled.
    A normal auto fails on two counts, not only does it change gear automatically but the torque converter also allows for engine and wheels to 'float' relative to each other, unless kept locked up.

    Basically I like tackling a sinuous road and easing the throttle on and off to trim the car's line, which only works properly if the ratio is fixed (including under deceleration, ie engine braking).

  5. #25
    Subaru Unimpreza SportWagon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    The Real Grand Valley, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    831
    Quote Originally Posted by Yw-slayer View Post
    My non lawyer friends said

    3 v 2 pedals
    Can stall v Can't stall

    Makes sense. I earlier thought there were cars with hand operated clutches but if there aren't then 3 v 2 works. Stalling v not stalling also works in any case.
    If the road conditions are wet, turning traction control off might help reduce the probability of stalling. If the traction control system was designed assuming an automatic transmission.

  6. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    3,569
    But it's not possible to stall an auto engine surely, even with TCS on? Admittedly I've never tried.

  7. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    10,171
    I'm not immediately sure how you could stall any engine with TCS.

  8. #28
    Subaru Unimpreza SportWagon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    The Real Grand Valley, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    831
    With a clutch, if the TCS works by cutting power to the engine when wheel slippage is detected, if the TCS detects a little slippage as the clutch is first being engaged (e.g. because of a wet road), it can cut the power below what is needed to finish engaging the clutch without stalling. (Because the TCS design is assuming an automatic tranmission, i.e. torque converter).

  9. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    10,171
    Are you talking about a car that has been transmission swapped? If a totally factory car has TCS, whatever module controls TCS is certainly going to be aware of what type of transmission is equipped. Nobody would send a car out into the world programmed for incorrect parts.

    Except maybe Fiat, because that seems like something they would do.

  10. #30
    Subaru Unimpreza SportWagon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    The Real Grand Valley, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    831
    The transmission has not been swapped.

    The basic assumption of the overall TCS design is presumably an automatic transmission (no clutch).

    Perhaps the TCS does use different parameters for a known manual transmission/clutch, but its parameters seem to be such that I find it easier to avoid stalling when attempting to start moving in the wet by turning that TCS off.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •