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Thread: NAS Recommendations

  1. #11
    Corvette Enthusiast Kchrpm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Servo View Post
    I did the same thing with OneDrive and as far as I can tell, it likes to leave local copies on your hard drive. I'm looking to move large files into cloud storage to both handle backups for me and clear up local drive space, how well does Google work for that?
    I use a Chromebook, so Drive functionality is built in. It self-manages local cache, and I believe typically the only things it keeps locally are Google Doc/Sheet/Slides files, and whatever you mark to be available offline.

    There's also a download folder where you can manually save items locally only (which it claims it will delete automatically for space, though I don't think I've ever seen it do that).

  2. #12
    Severed Member JoeW's Avatar
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    Well Synology makes a small 2 drive NAS which is nice for under $300. They also have much larger solutions as well. Drobo is another company but their systems start at 5 drives.

    https://www.amazon.com/Synology-Bay-...rch&th=1&psc=1

  3. #13
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    My old Raven RV02E case holds a 3rd gen i5 and basic motherboard with 4x6TB drives set up as a Win10 Storage Space with redundancy. It's the windows version of raid5 which gives me around 16-18TB of space. It's quite easy to set up although I did buy a kindle book on setting up a Win10 home server. The OS and not much else is on an old 128GB SSD. It runs Plex, an FTP server (within the household only), store all of the stuff including FLAC and MP3 files played via our Sonos and Heos kit. There are ways to set up external FTP access but I don't really need it.

    I've reformatted the SSD once and the storage space picked up right after a fresh Win10 install. Once you've set it up you don't need to hook up a monitor. I use remote desktop connection to log in and sort out windows updates, driver updates, etc.

    The only thing which has failed so far are the old and notoriously bad Seagate 3TB drives which is why I replaced them all one by one but as quickly as possible with the 6TB drives. It took a few days as Win10 needed time to build the array, which I would sort out in the evening. Basically 1 drive every day or so.

    Something like that is worth considering (with a quieter case) if you don't think that's overkill. It is slight overkill for me and I am the sort of person who has backup keyboards, mice, and phones at home and in the office. So it depends on what your needs are. I do also have several cloud services. I use spideroak unlimited and actually back up all the stuff from that server onto it anyway. It's good but not the fastest. Dropbox is the fastest but the most expensive. Onedrive is good but sync can be slightly clunky although you can store a lot offline and download it if you want (and in latest version of Windows see at a glance in Explorer whether a file is local or cloud only). Google Drive is a good middle ground.

  4. #14
    Female Masturbatory Aid
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    Interesting. The Synology one may be the ticket. I won't ask about RAID, as I:
    A: Know fuck all about it
    B: Don't care to know more about it.

  5. #15
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    Same, which is why I use Windows RAID.

    If it helps, a long time ago I had a 2-bay QNAP NAS. I ended up replacing it with this Windows machine since it was just too slow for almost anything and I didn't like having to work through the software. It just felt limiting, whereas with Windows you can do anything.

    There is also some utility in having 2 full-size computers at home, namely redundancy. However I then built a 4-series HTPC in a Silverstone Sugo case which now has a GTX1060 in it for VR (which I haven't had time or energy to set up at home). So I'd probably use that if I had to, particularly as it's a tiny and easily transported.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kchrpm View Post
    I use a Chromebook, so Drive functionality is built in. It self-manages local cache, and I believe typically the only things it keeps locally are Google Doc/Sheet/Slides files, and whatever you mark to be available offline.

    There's also a download folder where you can manually save items locally only (which it claims it will delete automatically for space, though I don't think I've ever seen it do that).
    Nice, I might end up switching to Google Drive and see how it works.

  7. #17
    Severed Member JoeW's Avatar
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    I literally have a drawer full of labeled hard drives and a use a two bay docking station that cost $29 to get old info when I need it. Just grab a drive out of the drawer and pop it in the docking station. That is NAS on the super cheap

  8. #18
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  9. #19
    Consultant KillerB's Avatar
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    I've got a Synology DS218+ with two 8TB WD HDs - I forget the model but they're the ones intended for NAS. Aside from ease of setup, the other reason I went this route is power consumption. I looked into building my own, and - at the time anyway - it would lead to me pulling a lot more wattage. I don't download and stream video from it, I mostly use it to store my RAW photo library and to store backups of the other devices in my home, so I didn't really need peak performance, and I wanted an always-on solution.

    I can't say enough about how simple it was to set up.

    I don't have the information handy (I did a fair amount of research on some NAS and photography forums) but as I recall, unless you're running a lot of data in and out of it all day, the NAS-specific solutions can save a lot of electricity.

    That said, the model I bought supposedly can stream 4K video quite well - but I don't have a 4K TV. Right now the real limit on performance is being on WiFi vs hardwired - the problem is that I'd much rather be on my couch than in my office most of the time.

  10. #20
    Female Masturbatory Aid
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    I believe, with that testimony, I'm sold.

    I have a switch in the living room that I can plug it into. Provided the fucking cat didn't chew through the ethernet like it has every other thing. (Xbox AV cable, Mac charger cable, about 3 dozen earbuds, my phone, my driver's license, toilet handle...)

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