Page 442 of 443 FirstFirst ... 342392432440441442443 LastLast
Results 4,411 to 4,420 of 4421

Thread: The Lounge of Terrestrial Wheelmen

  1. #4411
    Crime Fighter Cam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Posts
    2,541
    I never have problems with that either.

    Maybe you should stop riding and hit the gym instead.
    Last edited by Cam; November 30th, 2017 at 05:24 AM.

  2. #4412
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    2,953
    Wow, I've found Continentals of all sorts to be incredibly difficult to mount on the rim vs other tires. So far, Michelins have been the easiest for me.

    Also:

  3. #4413
    Senior Member G'day Mate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    2,285
    25mm

  4. #4414
    High Plains Luddite George's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    2,721
    I haven't ridden my 25mm tire bike in months. Thinking of selling it when spring rolls around again and people are buying bikes.

    However, that will guarantee I'll get a new job (not that I'm looking) withing cycling distance of home and want a road bike again.

    But until then...

    I like big tires and I cannot lie

  5. #4415
    Subaru Unimpreza SportWagon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    The Real Grand Valley, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    837
    Finally got out on Sunday for the first time since August 20th. The wife has got back to long independent shopping trips, so that helped, since I dropped her off and got home just before noon, needing to meet her at the mall at 5:45pm.

    About an hour to get ready, including strava setup. Not fast for the 40km, but not as bad as I thought it might be. It's good to ride in the afternoon this time of year; about 5 to 7C all the time. Ears got red but not frozen as I left the warmer in my pocket so I could hear better. Toes did get numb. Not great.

    On the way home I got to ride down a monstrosity of modern transportation engineering. Google satellite doesn't show it yet. There's a nice bridge over the highway near home; nice because it doesn't have any on-ramps for the highway. I've been riding over it since it was pretty much in the country already. it used to be simply two lanes each way, and the right-hand lanes seemed slightly wide.

    Well, they've sort of adopted the basic strategy of turning the four lanes into three and adding a bi-directional bicycle path such that the uphill lane is actually riding facing the downhill car traffic. (There is a hashed yellow divider, and currently I think a few bollards, but before that divider is a regular vertical curb; I didn't ride that lane uphill, so I'm not sure how nerve-wracking and/or skill-testing it really is).

    Good news is I seemed to be able to just use the right-hand of the two full lanes going uphill on the way out. No real harassment, but then traffic was light. One person/car stopped at the light after it such that I couldn't get by on the right, but it could have just been random--they didn't get within inches as I have seen sometimes. The person/car behind them seemed to deliberately give me room, so I rode up to about their front wheel. When I started up, they seemed to wait for me to get going, and into the bicycle lane on the other side of the intersection, before passing me. And they soon caught up to the car I'd stayed behind. Almost like they were giving a demo to their passengers about how I wasn't holding them up.

    On the way down I pretty much need to use the new bicycle lane; the main road is now mostly one lane only on that side, except for some left-turn lanes, and the left-turn lanes cause the right-hand lane to be effectively extremely narrow where you might actually need it wider. You go up and down several gutter-type curbs, and at some of those they have those weird metal plates they put near pedestrian crossings. They are beginning to use green paint on the bicycle lanes, and I'm not sure what yours is like (I thought it was very textured); this, while not excessively slippery at least when dry, does not appear deliberately textured.

    At one point I saw a woman pushing her child in a push-chair up the hill in the appropriate lane, that is, towards me. Well, there was hardly any bicycle traffic so I didn't see it as an egregious abuse of the bicycle lane. But then I realized that at that point there is actually no separate pedestrian facility. In order to put the downhill left-turn lane in, they actually stole the old sidewalk at that point, making the section "mixed use". The signage isn't really finished yet (I hope).

    I got to the road where I used to practice my criterium turning to right-turn into a neighbourhood that let me pick up a long-standing bicycle path. This bicycle path is unusually wide, because in reality it is the straight continuation of the rerouted downhill road. When I first started riding out there in the late 1970's the road went straight, on what is now the bicycle path. Anyway, no criterium turn now; I needed to come practically to a stop to navigate the gutter, the metal plates, and then make the turn. There is actually a continuation of the bicycle path at that point which joins up with what I use later, but I always found the road ride through the neighbourhood more pleasant, and this day I really wanted to try and get recorded on my personal strava segment; a complex 36.9 kilometers including that section.

    So there seem to be several annoying features of this new bicycle path. This post might be the basis of a letter of discussion with a cycling club leader I know who I can feel out for the right approach to complaining.

    The funny thing is they did a brilliant job of arranging bicycle lanes at the T-intersection at the top of the hill in question, nicely mimicking what bicycles used to do before (ride between the two lanes, knowing that there would be a number of cars turning right from the right-hand lane, which at that time was not right-turn only (although in the re-arrangement they made it right-turn only, with an island)).


    I got home, about 3:30, with plenty of time to meet my wife, but ended up relaxing and meeting her just barely in time anyway.


    My private strava segment had recorded, and while my time was not the slowest for it (6th slowest, 39/44) those other times had been on very windy days which this was not. Also segments always record stopped time, and the only sort of rest I took was waiting at Northfield and Hill Street for a gap to cross coinciding with a longish break in the traffic in the far lane I was crossing to. Well, apart from about 30 seconds pausing at the top of the hill in Conestogo. On some other rides I might have taken other breaks, I can't recall. (The thing is, this segment has not recorded for most of this year because of lots of construction detours which are finally finished).

    Well I had been trying not to try too hard. My leg muscles did have a pleasant glow, nonetheless. The knees not too hammered.

    I remember looking at the heart rate up one hill, and thinking "I must switch the monitor's upper limit from 160 to 150". But, for the first time in maybe years, I had recorded some time (43 seconds) above 160. (160 or above?) Could have been the caffeine. (Breakfast at Timmy's). Hmm. 220 - 61 = 159. Yet, by backing off up the hills somewhat, I'd never got severely out-of-breath. And I'd never actually seen the time at 160 or above; I think 155 was the most I saw. Most of the little hills were more tedious than difficult.


    The most important thing about having done this ride is that it will make a big psychological difference to getting out next spring.
    Last edited by SportWagon; December 5th, 2017 at 03:36 PM. Reason: the cat => the car, plus other fixes

  6. #4416
    High Plains Luddite George's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    2,721
    Saw this elsewhere on the web and thought of overpowered. He would have liked this, I think.

    I didn't find a larger .gif. If you can't tell, it's a backpack cover that says CYCLISTS MAY USE FULL LANE.


  7. #4417
    Subaru Unimpreza SportWagon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    The Real Grand Valley, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    837
    Buried in my long post were some implicit questions about green paint on bicycle lanes.

    - Do they use green paint at all on bicycle lanes where you are?

    - (If so) is the green paint obviously textured, e.g. perhaps like fine stucco?

    - Do you ever find the green paint to make the lane more slippery (in general, only when the lane is wet) ?

  8. #4418
    High Plains Luddite George's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    2,721
    - Do they use green paint at all on bicycle lanes where you are?

    Out in the suburbs where I live, no. Sometimes, in the city, though.



    As you can see, taxis and loading/unloading motorists love the bike lanes in Denver.

    Source: https://denver.streetsblog.org/2017/...ng-i-70-loses/

    - (If so) is the green paint obviously textured, e.g. perhaps like fine stucco?

    I haven't ridden on it enough to have noticed.

    - Do you ever find the green paint to make the lane more slippery (in general, only when the lane is wet) ?

    Again, not enough experience, but I would be wary of any large area of paint as a potential slippery spot.

  9. #4419
    Senior Member G'day Mate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    2,285
    We tend have green, textured paint across intersections and other conflict areas, but mostly only in the inner-city

  10. #4420
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    2,953
    Downtown LA has some green lanes. I didn't get to ride them when they first went in, before the film industry bitched and moaned that it made it too hard to shoot historical things in downtown LA, and the paint was then replaced with just normal paint.

    Santa Monica has the bright green thermoplast in a lot of its bike lanes. The thermoplast paint tends to have that texture to it. When it first went in, there were a couple of spots that seemed slippery when it was wet, but now I've ridden in those lanes many times in the rain and they seem fine to me. The city tells me that thermoplast is used because it's not supposed to be slippery. I'm not sure if there's something about it when it's first been applied that makes it more slippery, but like I said, I haven't had an issue with it since that very first couple of days after it was installed.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •