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Thread: Nissan's new LMP1 engine - 10hp/kg engine

  1. #1
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    Nissan's new LMP1 engine - 10hp/kg engine

    The ZEOD RC will become the first entry in the Le Mans 24 Hours to complete a lap of the Circuit de la Sarthe under nothing but electric power in June. A single lap of each stint (a fuel stint lasts approximately one hour) will be electric powered, then the new Nissan DIG-T R 1.5 liter three-cylinder turbo engine will take over.

    The small engine weighs 40 kilograms (88lbs) and produces 400 horsepower. The base engine is only 500mm tall x 400mm long x 200mm wide. While the engine is technically too heavy to take as carry-on luggage on a plane, it would easily fit inside the luggage guides seen at major airports around the world.

    Revving to 7,500rpm, the DIG-T R produces 380Nm of torque. At a ratio of 10 horsepower per kilogram, the new engine actually has a better power-to-weight ratio than the new engines to be used in the FIA Formula 1 World Championship this year.

    The Nissan ZEOD RC will occupy will run as the Garage 56 at this year’s Le Mans 24 Hours, an additional entry reserved by the ACO for new and ground-breaking technologies never previously seen at the classic French endurance event.

    Lessons learned from the development of the revolutionary racecar will also be used in the development of Nissan’s planned entry into the LMP1 class of the FIA World Endurance Championship in 2015.

    “Our engine team has done a truly remarkable job with the internal combustion engine,”said Darren Cox, Nissan’s Global Motorsport Director.“We knew the electric component of the Nissan ZEOD RC was certainly going to turn heads at Le Mans but our combined zero emission on demand electric/petrol power plant is quite a stunning piece of engineering. Nissan will become the first major manufacturer to use a three-cylinder engine in major international motorsport. We’re aiming to maintain our position as industry leaders in focussing on downsizing. Lessons learned from the development of the engine will be seen in Nissan road cars of the future.

    “Our aim is to set new standards in efficiency in regards to every aspect of the car – power train, aerodynamics and handling. For the power train we have worked closely with the team at Total to not only reduce friction inside the engine, but within all components of the power train. Friction is the enemy of horsepower and tackling that has been one of the efficiency targets we have concentrated on heavily.”

    After extensive dyno testing, the Nissan ZEOD RC hit the track for the first time last week with both the electric and internal combustion engines in place. Both the petrol and electric power plants run through the same five-speed gearbox that transfers power to the ground via Michelin tires.
    ---
    The Nissan ZEOD RC will undergo an extensive test program over the next four months prior to it making its race debut at this year’s Le Mans 24 Hours on June 14-15. [/QUOTE]



    Last edited by LHutton; January 29th, 2014 at 09:07 AM.

  2. #2
    I'd love to read an in-depth article about what kind of engineering and materials tricks were used to achieve that low weight. Darn impressive.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Fogelhund's Avatar
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    btw.. it isn't a LMP1 engine, it runs unclassified. It is impressive though, mostly in weight. We've seen 1.5l turbos put out much more power of course, such as the mill in the Brabham BT-55, but that was some 330lbs.

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    If it holds together, it'll be a damn miracle.

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    1) Packaging tweaks
    2) Installation in Caterham
    3) ???
    4) Winning.
    Whoomah!

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    I notice an interesting design on the cylinder head. it seems the block is part of the cylinder, while the head is another portion of the cylinder. Conventional engines cylinder is 95% manufactured in the engine block, this seems to be 50% block, 50% cylinder head.


    I have seen a similar design in one other place before, MotoCzysz C1-990. The Z-Line 990 was different in which the cylinder head was the main engine block component.


    Has anyone else seen if this design used in LMP engines or F1 yet?
    Last edited by Godson; January 29th, 2014 at 12:48 PM. Reason: Clarity

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    Actually, looking at the photos, they are all CAD photos and a photoshop. There aren't any signs of cylinder head seams, crank housing seams, or any other way to disassemble the internals for the engine...

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    I'm not seeing that--I think the head seam is actually a little shallower than normal, if you look at the top picture and the picture with the dude carrying the engine.
    Whoomah!

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    I don't see any seams at all, but if I did, they'd be 50% up the cylinder wall. For a high boost application that is *the* way to go, since you reduce the chances of a gasket failure. This design has been used in prototypes elsewhere, but it's very difficult to put into production because the "head" castings become very complex and failures become expensive. If the tooling for that kind of production exists or could be made, it would change a lot of things about high specific output engines. Maybe Nissan is onto something, or maybe the relative simplicity of a triple makes this type of production easier? Or, maybe when you're talking extremely low volume one-off engines it really doesn't matter, and this is a 100% "because we can" exercise. I dig the external oil pump and what I think is an internally driven mechanical fuel pump.. I think that's what that lower timing belt sprocket is doing? Which is where I'm seeing (maybe imagining) the head/block seam. Seems like it's also SOHC (probably still multivalve, though) which would cut weight and parasitic loss.

    Edit: Whoa, it's not intercooled either. Wonder what those intake charge temps look like at full tilt!

  10. #10
    mAdminstrator Random's Avatar
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    There's gotta be a seam at the crank centerline to get the crank in. The external oil pump looks to be part of a dry sump system, I'm guessing.

    I can almost convince myself I see a seam halfway up the block, in addition to the white one just about even with the dude's lapel-mike.
    Whoomah!

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