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Thread: OLED teevs

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Wonder View Post
    I've seen that, they have one in John Lewis on Oxford Street.
    It is spectacular. It's like a window into another world.
    It's also £35,000 (~$59,000)
    No biggie. That's only the cost of a tidy used M5 wagon.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 21Kid View Post
    I didn't think OLED had that bad of burn-in problems.
    "Rapid degradation of the organic materials". The degradation is irreversible and you can't really "wash" the screen wear out like you can with a plasma.

  3. #23
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    Right now OLEDs do suck.
    And LCD LED are still sucking, bar Sony ones.
    Plasmas are not sold anymore.

    Fuck this shit, I'm going to go DLP VPR next time around.

  4. #24
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    problem with the base materials they haven't figured out yet, or planned obsolescence? hmm

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blerpa View Post
    And LCD LED are still sucking, bar Sony ones.
    That's why I just bought one.

  6. #26
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    The brightness dropped drastically on my TV. $80 and a few days later, I have a new OEM bulb in it. Sometimes the "old" ways have benefits.
    Get that weak shit off my track

  7. #27
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    LG's investment in white OLED might be ready to pay off as the company achieves high production quantities for its 4K OLED TVs while competitors using RGB OLED still struggle to achieve viable yield levels to go mainstream with the screen technology.

    "The fact that nobody is even chasing us on that is an amazing benefit," says Hong. "An advantage that we'll probably feel for ten years. No one will catch us for 2-3 years, that's a pretty big lead."

    "When we bought the rights to white OLED from Kodak nobody else thought that was going to be a successful business," says Hong. "We were the only ones who said 'Hey, let's put some money down on that.' Nobody fought us for that. It's an interesting history. Kodak developed this white OLED and now that allows us to get this 80 percent plus yield."
    http://www.cnet.com/news/lg-says-whi...v-competition/

    This should move things along.

  8. #28
    Member Member 21Kid's Avatar
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    People need to stop buying curved TVs so they stop making them. They are making regular LED TVs curved now too.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by 21Kid View Post
    People need to stop buying curved TVs so they stop making them. They are making regular LED TVs curved now too.
    Agree wholeheartedly. I can't fathom a more idiotic - and downright negative for the product main purpose, alas optimal view of video content - feature in modern electronic devices.

  10. #30
    Member Member 21Kid's Avatar
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    Wow. These upcoming Vizios sound really good. I've been a fan of Vizio since I got mine in 2010.
    Vizio’s Affordable 4K TVs Are Your Perfect Stepping Stone to Ultra HD

    When they were introduced at CES, Vizio’s P-Series LCD sets did something most other LCD TVs at the show didn’t: They made buying a 4K set seem enticing and affordable. Starting at $1,000 for a 50-inch panel, the Ultra HD resolution (3,840 x 2,160) wasn’t the only thing that made the new TVs stand out.

    The other perks included full-array backlight panels with local dimming. That kind of setup is normally only found on the highest of the high-end LCD sets, but Vizio has been adding these once-expensive features to all its TVs in 2014.

    The 70-inch P-Series set has 72 local-dimming zones, while the rest of the models have 64 zones. Each of the sets also has a technology called Active Pixel Tuning that helps eliminate light bleed even further. The benefits of both features will be plain to see in terms of sharp contrast: Granular control over brightness combined with the balanced, bright lighting of a full-array LED should help the P-series approach the near-perfect picture quality that OLED delivers.

    Hardware-wise, the P-series continues Vizio’s design trend of thinning out the bezel to bestow a wall-to-wall picture effect upon your eyeballs. The new sets have a native refresh rate of 240Hz, as well as a simulated “Clear Action Rate” of 960Hz if you’re really into the soap-opera effect. To handle all that motion processing and 4K content, the P-series is driven by six processing cores: A quad-core GPU and a dual-core CPU.

    The 50-inch P-series set will sell for $1,000, the 55-incher will go for $1,400, the 60-incher is priced at $1,700, the 65-inch model will cost $2,200, and the 70-incher will sell for $2,500. More good news: None of them are curved.
    One of the reasons I've been looking to replace mine is that while it has local dimming, there is quire a bit of light bloom and bleed since it was an early adopter.

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