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Thread: Excel Sorcerers!

  1. #61
    Car Lawyer dodint's Avatar
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    The fact that you left-justified only one number cell on the sheet tells me you're not taking this seriously.

  2. #62
    Junior Potato
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    We she looks very different now. Bit of a hack job to get those 100s looking nicer.

    Also I am open to suggestions re left vs right justification. I've even got some text... in the middle!


  3. #63
    Corvette Enthusiast Kchrpm's Avatar
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    Google Sheets is great.

    Unnecessary yellow background not so much.

    But, according to A38, you're a bit of a "Concentratrion" anyway.
    Get that weak shit off my track

  4. #64
    Car Lawyer dodint's Avatar
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    I like Google Sheets. I use it far more than I use Excel anymore.

  5. #65
    Junior Potato
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    Keith, nice pickup on the typo.

    The yellow is staying.

  6. #66
    High Plains Luddite George's Avatar
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    I think that's more of a flax color than yellow.

    But, it is nice to see some activity in this thread again. Look how many people are just waiting to talk about something - anything! - other than the same handful of topics at the top of the Pit Stop every day.

    Carry on, sheetheads.

  7. #67
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    Im a fan of right justifying numbers, especially if they have the same number of decimal places.
    Then bigger numbers extend left, which to me looks more natural.

    Hmm did I see that you shrunk the column width, then combined cells where you needed wider?

    Sheets aren't really designed for having different sets of data. Yeah you can make it work, but that wasn't how they were originally designed.

  8. #68
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    Waiting for one of you to compile C into Excel: https://mrthefakeperson.github.io/Ex...rtual-Machine/

  9. #69
    Corvette Enthusiast Kchrpm's Avatar
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    If I knew how to write in C, I still wouldn't do that.

    I have, however, transitioned to using Google's version of free database and visualization tools instead of spreadsheets when possible. That's how I do the fantasy F1 stuff (though there's a spreadsheet intermediary for specific things I couldn't figure out how to do), and how I track most of my trivia hosting stats (but not all, because again there are things I couldn't quite figure out how to do).
    Get that weak shit off my track

  10. #70
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    Edit - wrote the below without realising there was a second page to the thread (!) Doh. However, my general advice still applies, don't multiply/divide by 100 for percentages, just keep the values as they are and apply a percentage format.


    If you made one cell in a column narrower without changing the others, then subsequent cells would be out of line with their column. I think it would quickly become unmanageable. Try drawing out what you want on paper and I think you'll see.

    In this case, I'd argue that the "x 100" is not needed.

    Google Sheets has a 'format as per cent' button in the top bar. So what I would do:
    - make E20 the 'answer cell'
    - set the formula for this answer cell to be simply 'B20 / C20' ie solute over solution. This will give 0.4375.
    - press the '%' button in the toolbar (or go format->number->percent in the menus) This will give 43.75% as the answer
    - then change F20 to just 'w/w'.
    - change D20 to equals, as in the above examples.


    I.e. maintain the underlying value as the decimal value 0.4375, and use formatting to display that value as a percentage, rather than actually multiplying the value.
    The benefit of this approach is that you can then use the calculated percentage value in further formulas, without having to divide it by 100 again - it avoids confusion.
    Last edited by samoht; December 5th, 2021 at 03:56 AM.

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