Page 68 of 74 FirstFirst ... 18586667686970 ... LastLast
Results 671 to 680 of 734

Thread: The "Looking to become a homeowner" Thread

  1. #671
    For the homeowners who live in snow country, what are you all doing for snow removal? My driveway is definitely too big to shovel (unless we're only dealing with an inch or two of snow), but I'm having a hard time justifying the cost of a snowblower thats only going to get used 3 or 4 months out of the year. I have a neighbor (retired farmer in his 70s) who's mentioned that he'd be willing to plow my driveway out with his tractor but I don't know how much I can depend on him (e.g. if he gets sick, or if I have to leave for work before he's had a chance to plow). He's only asking for gas money and for what a snowblower would set me back, I could have gas money to last into the next decade. Who's got a snowblower and how much do you actually end up using it?

  2. #672
    Member Member 21Kid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    Posts
    3,993
    I use to have a snow-thrower. Really only used it 2-5 times a year. Most of the snowfalls were lighter, and could push them with a shovel. It wasn't worth it to use the snow-thrower when it was so light. But, you live a little further north, so YMMV.

  3. #673
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    2,306
    Bought my first snow blower about ten years ago and I got my money's worth out of it and its successor. Lighter snows are cleared with a shovel but if its heavy and wet I break out the blower.

  4. #674
    THE KING IN THE NORTH! TheBenior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    1,006
    I have a 208cc (212cc? I forget) Troy-Bilt single-stage that I bought after I got my house, which has a 100 ft long side drive. I don't remember what I paid, but it was on sale when I bought it. It was definitely worth it that winter, though last winter wasn't as snowy.

    I'll clear my driveway, sidewalk (which are a bit wider than the typical sidewalk on my main street), the plow ridge that gets left in front of my driveway, and my elderly next door neighbors' sidewalk. I'll also clear a narrow path up and down my block if I'm feeling ambitious.

  5. #675
    Corvette Enthusiast Kchrpm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    5,699
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBenior View Post
    and my elderly next door neighbors' sidewalk.
    What a sweetheart. I hope you get some hot cocoa and/or baked goods as a thank you.
    Get that weak shit off my track

  6. #676
    Roundy-Round Racer tigeraid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    London ON Canada
    Posts
    746
    Buying a new snowblower even in most parts of Canada can sometimes seem like a "waste." I only used mine twice all last winter, but it was an ABNORMALLY small amount of snow last year.

    I don't think I'd ever buy a new one, but a used one for a couple hundred bucks is worth the investment, in my opinion. Especially if you have a gravel or dirt driveway, as opposed to paved. Shoveling a paved driveway is merely a good workout--shoveling dirt or gravel is a pain in the ass.

  7. #677
    Although it might require the jaws of life, I think I'm going to have to bite the bullet and pry open my wallet. Thought about buying a cheap used one but I think I'd rather get something that lasts. The world of power equipment definitely seems to be 'you get what you pay for'.

  8. #678
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    3,975
    So, I'm currently on a kick to reinsulate my house. I've decided I want to use a slow rising spray in foam. Tiger Foam has a really easy to use and understand mobile site, and from what I can tell, a decent product.

    Anyone have any experience with this stuff.

    I'll be doing the work myself.

  9. #679
    Member Member 21Kid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    Posts
    3,993
    My step-dad was a construction foreman and they sprayed the upper level of their 100+ year old farm-house. But, they hired contractors. It worked pretty good from what I could tell. I'd imagine that if you have painted a car before, that it's roughly the same technique.

    Starting from scratch, I probably wouldn't use it. But, retrofitting an older house it makes sense, IMO.

  10. #680
    Crime Fighter Cam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Posts
    1,782
    Lori gets home this morning and I think we're going to start looking for realz. Thankfully, real estate is cheap here compared to other major cities. Equivalent houses in Hamilton, for example, are more than twice the price as here. One of Lori's colleagues left Stanford to come here to USC and bought a half-million dollar house, pretty much with cash money, because their California house was so valuable. A mortgage would easily be 2/3s to 1/2 of what we pay in rent right now. When we ordered the Forester, I joked to Lori, "So we have to buy a house now to afford a new car." She did not take it as a joke.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •