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Thread: Cuda's Cars, v2.0

  1. #931
    Bad Taste novicius's Avatar
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    Hooligan!!

  2. #932
    Still way quieter than anything I own.

  3. #933
    Sitrep:

    1) No real work or progress on the Supra, other than first stage cleaning of the interior. I did install the new IACV VSV but I'm sure now that isn't the main problem. I need to do some more reading about the system. I did confirm the pressure tank is holding pressure, because when I disconnected a vacuum line even after days of not driving the car, pressure was relieved. I attempted to install my extra Autometer boost/vacuum gauge on the Supra to get a likely more reliable reading, but it turns out Autometer uses a very different boost line attachment method (and size of the line, too) from the generic boost gauge. I don't happen to have a bunch of the right size tubing and a reducer just lying around... so janky boost gauge it is.

    2) I just ordered $900 of parts for the MR2. I haven't spent this much on it since... hmm, probably since the evaporator broke many moons ago. New moldings for the top of the doors, some EHPS fluid, stainless valve cover bolts (the OEM bolts are kinda stupid and lead to weeping around the valve cover), a new square shift selector bushing, oh and a Berk exhaust. It'll probably be quieter than what I have now which is just a straight pipe, but the Berk will flow better because it replaces the restrictive OEM B-pipe. And that better flow will come in handy when I turn up the boost. I'm in the research stages of that right now, looking up EBCs, FCDs, Toyota family turbo options, and intercoolers. Decent intercooler information for MR2s is really, really hard to come by. No one talks about pressure drop or anything. It was all I could do to find some flow numbers. It appears there are basically two cores that have ever been made for the side mount location: a thicker Greddy copy fin design (sold via no-name eBay, EMS Powered, Berk, KO Racing, PrimeDriven, and many others), or a larger again Spearco bar and plate (copied/modified by Phoenix Power, Apexi, Turbohoses, etc). So few kits are still available to buy new and they're all the Greddy copy design from what I've seen. Supposedly aluminum pipe is better than stainless steel for heat transfer properties, and some of the kits use SS or polished piping (kinda more bling than I'd want anyway). Choosing an IC kit may take some time.

    3) I wanted to change the boost gauge in the MR2 to the black face one. However I couldn't remove the push pins holding the A-pillar pod to the A-pillar. Those suckers are in there good. The boost gauge pulls out but not far enough to get to the back of it and disconnect the tube/wiring. I'm scared to remove the A-pillar from the car for fear of breaking 90s plastics or NLA clips. Also, when I learned the Autometer boost line connection utilizes a ferrule and a lock nut, it made me wonder if the ferrule is a one-time use thing or if it can be re-used when changing gauges.

    4) I feel like tsg would have some real good knowledge/experience with the DIY kind of stuff here.

    5) #boostedlife

  4. #934
    Today was interesting. My parents' Camry decided to throw a CEL for the first time. It's a '95 V6. Not bad after 23 years I guess (purchased in December '94).

    So I go over there to check it out, making sure I have my custom bent paperclip code reader with me. Find the usual Toyota diagnosis box under the hood, jump TE1 and E1, turn ignition to ON. No flashy flashy of the CEL. Try reconnecting the paperclip, still nothing. Different thickness paperclips in different areas of the terminal holes. Still no diagnostic mode to be found. Hmm. Check under the dash. Well there's a Diagnostic port there, too, like on the Supra. Except either TE1 or E1 (I forget which) is labeled under the lid but has no metal inside. Well that won't work. WTF is the deal here? I Google. Someone says check the vacuum diagram. I do and it says OBD-II. What! In 1995? With OBD1 diagnostic boxes on the car? Where's the OBD-II connector? Not under the dash! More Googling. Someone with a '96 4cyl had the same problem - no ability to check codes. Turns out, you have to remove the mini glovebox to the left of the steering wheel. The OBD-II port sits behind it. I have never heard of such things.

    So I go home to pick up my OBD2 reader and come back. I get a P0402 code - EGR flow too high. Hmm. I poke around some. Find the EGR VSV under the plastic engine cover, figure it's easy enough to check. It fails the resistance test hard. This is likely the/a problem.

    As I'm removing it to get the part number, I find another VSV nearby has completely broken off one nipple. This VSV leads to an actuator that connects to a rod that appears to turn a valve or plate inside the intake manifold. Likely some kind of intake volume control device for different RPM or load. With no VSV connection it's stuck in whatever mode is the default. No idea if open or closed but I suspect it's stuck in the "low RPM/load" mode because the Camry is always driven so gently and nobody has noticed anything out of the ordinary.

    So two VSVs and some vacuum line is on order. This leads me to a vacuum line rant which I'll perhaps get to at a later date. Suffice to say, 2.7mm ID appears to be the correct size in this case. Which you won't find at your local Autozone.

    Now the bad news: the underhood plastics are so brittle the engine harness ends of the plugs both broke when I removed them from the VSVs. The latch mechanism won't hold the plugs tight anymore. Gotta figure out what to do here... maybe an X pattern of zip ties once they go back on the new VSVs. Stupid 90s plastic.

  5. #935
    Bad Taste novicius's Avatar
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    Yeah TSG's banter is sorely missed.

    "Daily-driving a '95 Camry with zero rust" stories make me think SoCal must look like Cuba!

  6. #936
    It looks like a place where people drive cars of all varieties. Old, new, fancy, simple, pristine, beat up, and everything in between. It was weird when I went to South FL and people there tend to drive one of two things - if they have decent income, they replace their cars often for the latest and greatest. If they're of less means, they drive old beat up cars. There's almost no in-between. I have no idea where all the 5-10 year old cars go!

    Edit -sun damage is what you gotta watch out for in CA. Cracked or faded interior parts, clear coat peeling, oxidized paint, crumbling EPDM trim, that kind of stuff.
    Last edited by CudaMan; December 13th, 2017 at 09:05 AM.

  7. #937
    THE KING IN THE NORTH! TheBenior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by novicius View Post

    "Daily-driving a '95 Camry with zero rust" stories make me think SoCal must look like Cuba!
    Honestly, when I go to SoCal, it is weird seeing so many 90s cars with clean bodies.

  8. #938
    High Plains Luddite George's Avatar
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    There are lots of older, rust-free cars in Colorado, too. I'm wondering how long I can continue to drive 20th century cars without sign-holding beggars at intersections handing me money out of pity.

    "Here, man. You need this more than I do."

  9. #939
    Venturi3D.com for the FUTURE MR2 Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CudaMan View Post
    Now the bad news: the underhood plastics are so brittle the engine harness ends of the plugs both broke when I removed them from the VSVs. The latch mechanism won't hold the plugs tight anymore. Gotta figure out what to do here... maybe an X pattern of zip ties once they go back on the new VSVs. Stupid 90s plastic.
    Sounds like you're a candidate for a 3D printer!
    ║]=(86)=[║ Venturi3D.com

  10. #940
    That'd be lovely.

    I ended up using zip ties. Mom-unit reports the car has been just fine ever since I fixeded it.

    Wish all cars were that easy!

    The Supra is still not giving up its secrets. Won't be much longer and I'll have to start disassembling some major stuff on the turbo side of the engine.

    Meanwhile its engine bay harness plugs are fine. Still not brittle. You'd think underhood temps would be higher than that of a Camry. Perhaps Toyota used higher quality plugs on their halo car. But the MR2 plugs are also good. Strange one.

    Looks like my sister's Miata's throwout bearing has gone all grindy all of a sudden. Might be working on that before too long here, too.

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