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Thread: Cuda's Cars, v2.0

  1. #491
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    The inner tie rod looks pretty conventional - you can use a special inner tie rod tool ($40, Harbor Freight) or, if you're like me, use a massive adjustable wrench.

    The wire tie thing is *weird*. I have never seen that in my life!

    Edit: 1.5" (37mm) of jaw - plenty for most any tie rod.

    http://www.amazon.com/Channellock-8S...ywords=wideazz

    Edit 2: I'll bet you can rent an inner tie rod tool from Autozone or O'Reilly for free.
    Last edited by thesameguy; February 18th, 2016 at 03:58 PM.

  2. #492
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    I've see the wire boot ties before, though I can't recall off-hand which of my cars it was on.
    Whoomah!

  3. #493
    I thought about a crescent wrench (mine goes to 30mm but I'm sure my dad has a massive old wrench somewhere) but figured that would be too easy, there had to be a reason why there are special tie rod tools for sale/rent.

  4. #494
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    I think I ended up using a 32mm fan clutch wrench when I did the BMW's rack.
    Whoomah!

  5. #495
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    Quote Originally Posted by CudaMan View Post
    I thought about a crescent wrench (mine goes to 30mm but I'm sure my dad has a massive old wrench somewhere) but figured that would be too easy, there had to be a reason why there are special tie rod tools for sale/rent.
    Adjustable tools are never ideal, but if you have a good one that isn't prone to slipping or slop, it shouldn't be a problem... at least in California. In other, rustier places you very well might need a stouter tool to do the job.

  6. #496
    Well this was a FL car, then an AZ car, now a CA car, so I think I'm good.

    I never ever want a car that has been in a salty snowy state.

  7. #497
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    The Cadillac spent 40 years in Colorado and has been great to work on, but the Alfa spent five years in New Jersey and that was enough to weld the ABS sensors into the knuckles. The salt really makes it rough! Even though our cars get legislated off the road, they're a pleasure to work on until they do.

    On the Z, I should think a big ass adjustable wrench and a good sledge or other heavy hammer would be enough to break the inner tie rod. Get a good grip on the flats and then a few solid smacks. Admittedly, that approach nearly brought me to tears on the Volvo, but it was because I couldn't generate enough force, not because I was damaging anything. On other cars - XR, Fiero, Saab, Hyundai - it's been utterly painless with a 12" adjustable. Of course if you can indeed borrow the tool from Autozone et al, there is about zero reason not to do it. It just never occurred to me to try.

  8. #498
    5 minute drive to visit Dad's tool room is more fun than 10 minute drive to visit Autozone.
    Last edited by CudaMan; February 19th, 2016 at 12:07 PM.

  9. #499
    Hm, now getting a P0037 code (post-cat O2 sensor low voltage, on the opposite bank from the pre-cat sensor I just replaced). I don't think it means the car thinks the cat is bad, it's just not happy with the sensor performance or something. It still runs OK. Doing some research it seems to be a common problem on early 350Zs and lots of people have not resolved it with new sensor, new cat, ECU reset, etc. One guy did get it fixed under warranty after a second ECU and O2 sensor replacement. Another tech had to replace the ECU to solve the problem on a customer's car. Scary stuff given what I assume an ECU costs, plus programming at the dealership and dealing with moving my UpRev license to a different ECU.

    Guess the first easy step might be to swap sensors left to right and see whether the code follows.

    The power steering is cavitating now too, badly, but still drives fine on the street. Previous owner put Royal Purple ATF in the P/S system (it calls for ATF, don't worry). I will try Redline PS fluid next.

  10. #500
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    Do you have a wiring diagram for the o2 sensor to and from the ecm?

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