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Thread: The Lounge of Terrestrial Wheelmen

  1. #31
    What fresh hell is this? overpowered's Avatar
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    Rodney Kinkade, who attacked the Jamis-Hagnes Berman cycling team, hitting two of them with his car almost a year ago got a plea bargain and will only do 7 days in jail and 2 years probation:

    http://tucsonvelo.com/news/driver-hi...ays-jail/18135

    You guitar people may want to avoid his company:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skatterbrane

  2. #32
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    I love that. He's complaining that they were more than two abreast and not on the shoulder, which afaik isn't a requirement, then says he knew he hit them and knocked some of them down, but he didn't think they were hurt so he kept going. It's still hit and run even if nobody got hurt, jackass.

    Pretty disappointing, and I'm happy to let him know that there are cyclists who are also guitar players who are a little less likely to spend any money on his stuff.

  3. #33
    Subaru Unimpreza SportWagon's Avatar
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    What an appropriate name for his company.

    In Ontario in the spring, a pickup driver pulling a horse trailer clipped the front of a group of cyclists as he passed, but didn't run away.

    The driver was charged. But, in addition, some of the cyclists, including some who were somewhat severely injured were charged with "failure to move right when being passed". Last I heard the charges against the driver had been fairly quickly upheld and the decision for the other charges was deferred.

    Of relevance is a bylaw in the region of the accident which requires cyclists to ride single file except when passing. In fact, because of that bylaw the cyclists were running their pace-line the "wrong way" (so the passers were on the left, rather than coming up the inside, so that someone was continually "passing"), which makes it harder for the front to adjust at all when being passed. (If the pace line circulated the other way, the leader about to pull left could not do so, and the line would naturally single up, but going the way it was, it takes a while before those at the front have somewhere to move over to),

    And last I heard safety experts were being brought in to try and demonstrate the bylaw is dangerous.

    I know someone who was in the group, and got most of my information by email. I think I saw a couple of items in the paper newspaper too. I should try to find some links.


    Edit... took a long time, wasn't till I added "Waterloo Cycling Club" I got anywhere...

    http://waterloocyclingclub.ca/forums/topic/accident
    http://kitchener.ctvnews.ca/cyclists...sley-1.1351424
    http://www.therecord.com/news-story/...ar-heidelberg/
    http://www.therecord.com/news-story/...g-laws-bylaws/

    Actually, I still don't find documentation of the court case or resolution.

    http://waterloocyclingclub.ca/forums...riding-abreast
    Last edited by SportWagon; January 15th, 2014 at 09:08 AM.

  4. #34
    Crime Fighter Cam's Avatar
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    Got a pinch-flat this morning on the Sutek while riding to school. I had everything I needed to fix it on the road... except a wrench to remove the rear wheel! (Front wheel is quick release but the back is not.) Doh! Stupid oversight. Jogged back home and got Lori to drive me to school so I wouldn't miss class.

  5. #35
    Subaru Unimpreza SportWagon's Avatar
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    Impertinent comments...

    Flats can be ridden on.

    If you patch tubes rather changing them you don't need to remove the wheel.

    If you had a bicycle like the following 1910 model you could replace the tube (or tubular tire) without removing the wheels.
    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/146296687865660525/
    Wait, if I understand correctly, that bicycle was ridden in the 1910 Tour de France with no brakes! Perhaps that was just its name. Presumably it was a fixed wheel. Adding brakes would complicate changing tires.

    #4. TA used to make a tool for undoing their crank bolts which was of a size which could fit wheel bolts. It was the tool of choice for early 1980's fixie riders.
    http://www.hudsonbicycles.com/tools.html
    http://www.hudsonbicycles.com/images...anner-15mm.jpg
    I've posted this before.
    Last edited by SportWagon; January 15th, 2014 at 08:58 AM.

  6. #36
    Crime Fighter Cam's Avatar
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    Good point about not having to remove the wheel. However, I don't use patch kits anymore. Haven't used one since the '90s. I only replace tubes now. :shrug:

  7. #37
    High Plains Luddite George's Avatar
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    It appears that road rage against cyclists is nothing new. A big part of my day job is working in Excel, creating formulas, formatting data, and so forth. This work doesn’t require 100% of my brain, so I listen to a lot of audiobooks from the library at work.

    Right now I’m listening to this book. If you don’t want to click the link, all you need to know is the book describes events in 1897 in and around New York City.

    I just heard the following passage and transcribed it as well as I could. I’m not sure about the words before question marks below, but they don’t matter to the point being made here.

    “[William Randolph] Hearst was fond of giving his reporters bicycles, so that his crew was like another regiment of scorchers – the lunatics who barreled through city traffic on silk(?) cycles, lunal(?) racers, and greased crack-a-jack(?) bikes; their futuristic bronze headlights ablaze and slopping kerosene.

    There were enough of these wildmen riding up the sidewalks and getting horsewhipped by irritated carriage teamsters that Hearst retained a specially designated bicycle attorney on the paper’s staff.”
    Last edited by George; January 15th, 2014 at 10:18 AM.

  8. #38
    Corvette Enthusiast Kchrpm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    A big part of my day job is working in Excel, creating formulas, formatting data, and so forth. This work doesn’t require 100% of my brain, so I listen to a lot of audiobooks from the library at work.
    Replace audiobooks with podcasts and we are the same person in this regard.
    Get that weak shit off my track

  9. #39
    What fresh hell is this? overpowered's Avatar
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    The landscape of the roads was very different in 1897.

    1. There were very few, if any cars, depending upon where you were.
    2. Horses do have a tendency to get spooked by bicycles.
    3. There was no such thing as a jaywalking law. The streets were pedestrian space.
    4. By 1897, cities mostly had smooth paved roads due to the efforts of bicycling advocates.
    5. Horse back riders and wagon/carriage drivers went slow in the cities due to all of the pedestrians and traffic congestion.
    6. Bicycles tended to be the fastest things on the road in the cities and a lot of them went way too fast for the conditions.
    7. By 1897, bicycle technology had advanced to the point that they were relatively affordable and had been made fairly practical given the availability of pneumatic tires (since 1889) and the geared chain drive allowing equal sized wheels (since 1885) and what were then considered light weight steel alloys which had advanced a lot in the late 1800's. This meant that there were a large amount of bicycles on the road.

    Basically, imagine a relatively crowded plaza with pedestrians everywhere and bicyclists trying to ride through them at 12-15mph and you've got a pretty decent picture, minus the horses.

    This was one of the first things that came up when I did a search for "scorcher bicycle"


  10. #40
    High Plains Luddite George's Avatar
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    ^ cool video!

    And Denver is still a big bicycle city. All the cool kids ride fixies with crazy colors. Maybe their great-grandfathers were Scorchers.

    A nearby smaller city (Parker) recently instituted a bicycle speed limit on paths in city parks after a rider collided with a woman pushing a baby carriage. Sounds like that could have been news from the 19th century as well.

    I wonder how Scorchers dealt with horse poop all over the streets back then. They rode carefully, I guess.

    Replace audiobooks with podcasts and we are the same person in this regard.
    I listen to podcasts too, and Old Time Radio is a lot of fun as well. Check out Old Time Radio at www.archive.org. There are more cool old radio shows there for free download or streaming than you could listen to in a lifetime in the cube farm at work. Some of my favorites: Gunsmoke, Dragnet, Dimension X and X Minus One, 21st Precinct, Escape, and Theater Five, just to name a few. Happy listening to whatever gets you through your day.

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