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Thread: Tesla!!!1 (Was: Tesla Sales banned in NJ.)

  1. #751
    Ask me about my bottom br FaultyMario's Avatar
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    I'd think the undercarriage is made up by stressed members of the car's structure, and thus why I imagine that, in one hundred years of automotive engineering, the paradigm has been to use crossed members.

    i think problems affecting a stamped unibody structure would only appear over the long term, after wear and tear have flexed and stressed it.

    It might be a genius cost-savings measure but i just don't see it. to me it seems as a roll of the dice on an expensive recall.
    acket.

  2. #752
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    I honestly haven't followed the design of the truck, because I honestly find the thing repulsive.

    It's too much new in all the wrong ways, and it is YEARS behind the announced production date.

  3. #753
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    Yeah, the truck design is a bit too much for me as well.

    Last I heard is that it's just going to be like Honda Ridgeline- Unibody construction. Used to be more innovative with exoskeleton... meaning the outside panels will be stressed as well. However, for whatever reasons they're not doing that anymore? Anyway, even unibody construction will offer more weight saving than the traditional truck frame design. Cybertruck delays are probably indicative of engineers discovering issues during development...

    Whatever. If I do buy a Tesla, it'll be a 3 or Y, not the truck. If you want to haul heavy load or tow something heavy, EVs probably don't quite make sense. I'm actually a bit surprised that the Tesla Semis seems to be doing ok during tests so far. We'll see if that's really true.

  4. #754
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    Well anyway apparently Toyota are doing gigacasting better.

    https://www.notebookcheck.net/Toyota....753359.0.html

    SUCK IT ELUN AND TESLUNS

  5. #755
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    I don't know much about die casting, but I think part of why we're seeing more of it now in car frames is the increase in aluminum chassis cars. I think it's not as feasible to do with steel.

    I don't think there's necessarily a problem with it, and it doesn't seem to be a thing that only Tesla is doing. In addition to the Toyota article, Yamaha has a website showing off their die cast frames.

  6. #756
    Spiny beast TheBenior's Avatar
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    FWIU, motorcycles with cast aluminum frame damage are generally totalled out by insurers.

  7. #757
    Junior Potato
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBenior View Post
    FWIU, motorcycles with cast aluminum frame damage are generally totalled out by insurers.
    Depends on the crash type, but in general if it's a head-on a bike will be written off because the frame will most likely split where the forward segment is welded to the sides of the frame, and that kind of damage is impossible to repair back to as-new condition. Often the split is impossible to see with the naked eye so a front impact crash will be an automatic write-off.

    It will be interesting to see how die-cast car bodies are able to handle impacts. Unlike motorcycles, they have significant impact absorption zones which may not transfer a huge amount of energy into the die-cast components, and if they did then you'd have other things to worry about.

  8. #758
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    I think a lot of repair challenge comes just from the frame being aluminum, rather than being cast or sheet.

  9. #759
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    I think batteries are the main issue? After a severe crash with batteries damaged, do you really want to fix that?

    Aluminum is definitely more expensive to fix though.

  10. #760
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    I was commenting on whether frames with die cast components are more difficult or expensive to fix than frames without them, and the specific example of modern motorcycle frames that are mostly die cast aluminum and too expensive to repair.

    I think using aluminum is what makes frame components possible to die cast, and also makes them difficult to repair.


    On the specific example of motorcycles getting totaled: I had a 2006 Ninja 500 with a pretty simple steel square tube frame that got knocked over by a slow moving van back in 2008. It only needed plastic bodywork replaced, and was pretty close to being totaled just from the cost of plastics. I think any welding/fixing of the frame would have been out of the question even on that bike!

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